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PLANT DISEASE AND INSECTS

Click on this link to diagnose common plant diseases in Minnesota

PLANT DISEASE DIAGNOSTIC LINK

LINK TO PLANT JUICE SUCKING INSECTS COMMON TO MINNESOTA

Plant Insects

Grubs Link

Box Elder Bugs  Life History: The boxelder bugs pass the winter in the adult stage in dry, sheltered places where they have accumulated in gregarious masses. They often choose buildings or houses as a protected place to overwinter. When weather warms up in the spring, the bugs leave their places of hibernation to fly to boxelder trees where they deposit their eggs. Eggs are usually deposited in bark crevices and hatch in 11 to 14 days. The nymphs feed by inserting their beaks into leaves, fruits or soft seeds and sucking the plant juices. Feeding continues throughout the summer and the nymphs gradually mature becoming adults as cold weather approaches in the fall. In some areas there may be two broods of this insect, one reaching maturity in mid-summer and the second one in early fall.

Treatment- Out of doors insecticides have been used effectively on the trees to control the nymphs while they are actively feeding. Either the insecticide malathion or carbaryl (Sevin) may be recommended.

Cut worms

Cutworms feed at night on the stems of seedlings and transplants, severing them or sometimes consuming the entire seedling. They spend the daylight hours below the surface of the soil. Here's how to control these little critters.
 
Steps:
1.  Know what you're looking for. Cutworms are gray or dull brown fat caterpillars. They are 1 to 2 inches long with shiny heads.
 
2.  Look for cutworms curled near the base of young plants. You may have to dig a few inches into the soil to find them.
 
3.  Dig into the soil each morning and destroy any cutworms you find.
 
4.  Protect young plants from cutworms by placing a paper collar around new transplants. Push the paper collar into the soil at least 2 inches. The collar will decompose in time as the plant grows.